WIN tickets to MCC vs Rest of the World – courtesy of Hardys


Sportsmail has teamed up with Hardys Wine to offer four tickets to see MCC take on the Rest of the World at Lord’s on Saturday 5th July.

Hardys

To be in with a chance of winning, simply answer the following question:

Who is the current England cricket captain?

  • A) Kevin Pietersen
  • B) Alastair Cook
  • C) Ian Bell

E-mail your answer, along with your name, address and contact number to:

to arrive by 9am on Wednesday, July 2.

PLEASE NOTE: You must validate your entry with the words MCC TICKETS in your subject box; the tickets do not include travel to/from the ground, accommodation or hospitality; normal Associated Newspapers terms and conditions apply – the Editor’s decision is final.

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Cricket | Mail Online

Australia and New Zealand set to contest first ever day-night Test Match

By Mike Dawes

Australia and New Zealand are ready to contest the first day-night Test match.

Cricket Australia chief James Sutherland said that plans are at an advanced stage and their 2015/16 series is likely to feature a match with floodlights and a pink ball.

The venue, in Australia, is yet to be decided but the match will not be the traditional Boxing Day Test in Melbourne or New Year’s Test in Sydney and is more likely to be in either Hobart or Adelaide.

Australia captain Michael Clarke will lead his into the day-night game with New Zealand

Australia captain Michael Clarke will lead his into the day-night game with New Zealand

New Zealand spinner Daniel Vettori might have to use a pink ball

New Zealand spinner Daniel Vettori might have to use a pink ball

‘The challenge is to try to make Test cricket more accessible for fans,’ said Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland.

The move could lead to the introduction of a pink ball to be used under lights.

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Cricket | Mail Online

Worcestershire’s academy director Damian D’Oliveira dies aged 53, as son of England legend Basil loses long fight with cancer

  • Worcestershire’s academy director Damian D’Oliveira has died aged 53
  • D’Oliveira passed away after a battling cancer for two and a half years
  • D’Oliveira’s dad, Basil, was a cricketing legend for the county and England

By Mike Dawes

Worcestershire’s academy director Damian D’Oliveira has died at the age of 53, the county have confirmed.

D’Oliveira, the son of Worcestershire and England legend Basil D’Oliveira, had been battling cancer for the last two and a half years.

A statement on the county’s official website read: ‘The players were informed of the news of his death shortly before the start of today’s [June 29] LV= County Championship match with Glamorgan at New Road.

Sorely missed: Worcesteshire's Damian D'Oliveira has died aged 53 after a two-and-a-half-year cancer battle

Sorely missed: Worcesteshire’s Damian D’Oliveira has died aged 53 after a two-and-a-half-year cancer battle

‘He leaves his wife Tracey and two other children in Marcus and Dominic.’

D’Oliveira played for Worcestershire between 1982 and 1995 and scored more than 9,000 first-class runs.

In his capacity as academy director he had overseen the introduction of a number of talented players into the first team at New Road, including his son Brett.

D’Oliveira’s father Basil passed away at the age of 80 in November 2011 after a long battle against Parkinson’s disease.

Born in South Africa, Basil D’Oliveira – or ‘Dolly’ as he was affectionately known – made headlines in 1968 when he was included in the England squad for the tour of his home country which had to be called off as the South African apartheid regime refused to accept his presence.

The incident marked the start of South Africa’s sporting isolation. Basil D’Oliveira played for Worcestershire between 1964 and 1980.

Former Worcestershire chairman Duncan Fearnley says the memory of the academy director, who has died at the age of 53, will live on through the many players he brought through the club’s youth ranks.

Eyes on the prize: D'Oliveira is the son of Worcestershire and England legend Basil who died in November 2011

Eyes on the prize: D’Oliveira is the son of Worcestershire and England legend Basil who died in November 2011

Speaking as former team-mates gathered for the county’s old players’ day, Fearnley explained how Damian had given his life to cricket and to Worcestershire.

‘He had a good career here, he loved this club like his dad did,’ Fearnley said.

‘His name will live on through the players out there now in the first team as many of them came through the academy he was in charge of.

‘They have all come through the ranks together.’


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Cricket | Mail Online

Australia and New Zealand set for first ever day-night Test match in late 2015

  • Historic Test will take place in either Adelaide or Hobart
  • Play would begin at around 2pm each day and pink ball would be used
  • Traditional Boxing Day and New Year Tests not being considered

By Mike Dawes

Australia and New Zealand cricket officials say their national teams will likely to meet in the world’s first day-night Test match in November next year, either at Hobart or Adelaide. 

James Sutherland, Cricket Australia chief, and his New Zealand Cricket counterpart David White said that talks in Melbourne last week advanced plans for the match and both countries ‘are supportive of the innovation and its clear benefits.’

New Zealand are scheduled to tour Australia from late 2015 and Sutherland said the venue for the historic match had been narrowed down to the Adelaide Oval or Hobart’s Blundstone Arena. Play would likely begin at 2 pm each day and a pink ball will be used.

Historic: The Adelaide Oval is one of two venues being considered by Cricket Australia for a day-night Test

Historic: The Adelaide Oval is one of two venues being considered by Cricket Australia for a day-night Test

Setting: The Bellerive Oval in Hobart could host the day-night Test between Australia and New Zealand

Setting: The Bellerive Oval in Hobart could host the day-night Test between Australia and New Zealand

‘We are serious about pushing ahead with the concept of day-night Test cricket,’ Sutherland said. 

‘We feel it will only strengthen the position and possibilities for test cricket in many parts of the world,’ he added. ‘There are many test matches played during non-holiday periods when adults are at work and kids are at school. That’s not an ideal way to promote the highest form of the game.’

Sutherland said there was no intention of shifting Australia’s marquee Boxing Day or New Year Test matches to a day-night format ‘given they are staged at the peak of holiday season,’ but matches in non-holiday periods would be considered. 

New ground: New Zealand, pictured on their 2011 tour of Australia, will be the opposition if plans go ahead

New ground: New Zealand, pictured on their 2011 tour of Australia, will be the opposition if plans go ahead

A pink ball would be used for a day-night Test

A pink ball would be used for a day-night Test

He said data showed annual Tests at Perth, Western Australia, which ends at around 9 pm Australian east coast time each day, rated 40 per cent higher than other matches played at the same time of year.

‘We believe that’s evidence in itself that we’ll get greater viewership and more opportunities for people to attend,’ Sutherland said. 

He accepted cricket traditionalists might not support day-night Test matches, but believed the commercial and other benefits outweighed reservations about tradition. 

‘I don’t think we’re ever going to get to a stage where everyone is completely satisfied or comfortable with it,’ Sutherland said. 

‘But I think if we go back 30-odd years in time when the first-ever day-night one-day internationals were played, I’m sure there was that same level of trepidation among some stakeholders including players about things like day-night cricket and white ball,’ he said. 

White said tradition was not in itself an excuse to reject innovation. 

‘People have talked about messing with the traditions of Test cricket,’ he said. ‘But since it was first played in (1877) there’s been significant changes – covered pitches, fielding restrictions, over limits, introduction of helmets, change in the no-ball law etc.

Tradition: The annual MCG Boxing Day Test and SCG New Year Test are not being considered for the plans

Tradition: The annual MCG Boxing Day Test and SCG New Year Test are not being considered for the plans

Audience: Test matches in Perth finish around 9pm on the Australian east coast and attract many viewers

Audience: Test matches in Perth finish around 9pm on the Australian east coast and attract many viewers

‘I think as administrators we must keep evolving and improving the game for our stakeholders. We need to be mindful of change, but keep an open mind on these things.’

Sutherland said trials would continue to develop a pink ball, which closely mirrors the performance of the red ball currently used in test cricket. Trials had already been carried out in Australia’s domestic Sheffield Shield competition and those would likely continue in Australia and New Zealand this year. 

He said consultation will also continue with both nations’ players’ associations, the ICC, fans and broadcasters. 


Cricket | Mail Online

West Indies and Pakistan handed ICC seats but South Africa snubbed

  • West Indies’ James Cameron awarded place on the new executive committee
  • Najam Sethi also handed spot but South Africa miss out

By Ian Ransom, Reuters

West Indies cricket president James Cameron and Pakistan board chairman Najam Sethi have been awarded seats on the International Cricket Council’s new executive committee, but South Africa has been snubbed from the game’s new world order.

The five-member executive committee is one of a raft of sweeping reforms that have entrenched cricket’s dominant economic powers India, England and Australia and, according to critics, at the expense of weaker ICC members and second tier Associate nations.

India, England and Australia keep permanent seats on the executive, which has drawn comparisons with the United Nations Security Council, with two of the seats elected on an annual basis by the ICC board.

Boost: Darren Sammy's West Indies have seen cricket president James Cameron awarded an ICC seat

Boost: Darren Sammy’s West Indies have seen cricket president James Cameron awarded an ICC seat

The executive will be chaired by Cricket Australia chairman Wally Edwards and includes India board chief and newly coronated ICC chairman N. Srinivasan, and Giles Clarke, chairman of the England and Wales board.

ICC chief executive David Richardson, who received a two-year contract extension, will sit as an ex-officio member, the ICC said in a statement released on Saturday.

Cricket’s world governing body also ratified the membership of a number of other committees at its annual conference in Melbourne, with Cricket South Africa the only full ICC member not represented on any of them.

Clarke will chair the Finance and Commercial Affairs Committee, with Edwards, Srinivasan, Bangladesh Cricket Board president Nazmul Hassan and Sri Lanka Cricket president Jayantha Dharmadasa (Sri Lanka). Richardson is also on the finance committee as an ex-officio member, the ICC said.

Turn to earn: Pakistan, who have the world's best spinner Saeed Ajmal in their midst, were also handed a seat

Turn to earn: Pakistan, who have the world’s best spinner Saeed Ajmal in their midst, were also handed a seat

New Zealand Cricket director Martin Snedden will chair the Governance Review Committee, with the ICC Development Committee, a body whose charter is to ‘grow cricket beyond its traditional boundaries’, to be chaired by Srinivasan.

Among a raft of other statements, the ICC confirmed that Netherlands and Nepal, who qualified for the ICC World Twenty20 tournament held in Bangladesh earlier this year, had been granted T20 international status.

‘This means there are now eight associate sides with T20I status,’ the ICC said.

Srinivasan, a 69-year-old industrialist long described as the most powerful man in cricket, was confirmed as ICC chairman on Thursday during the governing body’s annual meeting in Melbourne.

Srinivasan was ordered to step aside from his role as BCCI chief in March to ensure a fair investigation into an illegal betting scandal during last year’s Indian Premier League involving his son-in-law.

The Chennai-native was also accused of having a conflict of interest due to his India Cements company owning a franchise in the lucrative Twenty20 league.


Cricket | Mail Online

STUART BROAD: Alastair Cook has the full support of the England team

By Stuart Broad

Of course Alastair Cook will feel a bit of pressure at the moment because there are people on the outside trying to apply it to him, but let me assure you every person in that England dressing room knows he is one of our ‘gun’ batsmen and our leader to take us forward.

The key for Cooky is to block out the noise on the outside and listen to the guys who are in the changing room and enjoy the great team spirit we’ve got now.

One thing is for sure, Cooky won’t be at home worrying about what’s being said on Twitter or written in the media. He’ll be too busy with the lambs and chickens on his farm.

Pressure: Alastair Cook is under fire after the loss to Sri Lanka with his captaincy coming into question

Pressure: Alastair Cook is under fire after the loss to Sri Lanka with his captaincy coming into question

Backed up: Stuart Broad says Cook has the full support of the England dressing room

Backed up: Stuart Broad says Cook has the full support of the England dressing room

Things can be built up from outside the bubble of the dressing room with so much chatter going on, but when we are in there Cooky is very much his usual, calm self. We spend a lot of the time talking about his farm and how he’s got to get back home to mow the lawn, rather than what anyone might be saying.

He’s never been an overly demonstrative guy or someone who jumps on chairs and rants and raves.
He’s always been a calm presence in the dressing room and he still is just that. It’s what has made him the world-class player he’s been over the past 10 years.

Cooky has played more than 100 Test matches and it may have escaped a few people’s notice that he passed Geoff Boycott to become England’s fifth-highest run scorer of all time. You don’t achieve something like that without being made of strong stuff.

Due: Cook is suffering a lean run of form with the bat but his colleagues are tipping a big score is coming

Due: Cook is suffering a lean run of form with the bat but his colleagues are tipping a big score is coming

Remember in 2010 when he was struggling and there were calls for him to be dropped against Pakistan? He then got a hundred at the Oval after being dropped a couple of times and Asif throwing it over the keeper’s head for him to reach three figures. He went on to break all sorts of records and get himself an MBE that winter with his exploits in Australia.

Sometimes you just have to accept you are in the hands of what we call Mother Cricket and it will only take a play and miss or a slap through backward point for things to change for him. The worrying for India is that when it does change we know he scores big. I’ve got no doubt whatsoever that will happen.

We’ve all been there as players and you know that if you keep doing the right things then the tide will turn. I’ve no doubt whatsoever that will happen for Alastair.

Dressing room unity

Of course we were bitterly disappointed to lose to Sri Lanka by the narrowest of margins but there’s huge encouragement for the future. We now have an environment where young players can thrive.

Root, Ballance, Robson, Ali, Jordan and Plunkett have all come into the dressing room and been able to perform.

You read all winter about certain players saying how awkward they found the Australian tour but you can ask all 11 players involved in the Sri Lanka series how much they enjoyed it.

Injection of talent: Gary Ballance and Sam Robson are among the new breed of stars for England

Injection of talent: Gary Ballance and Sam Robson are among the new breed of stars for England

Yes we lost but we are enjoying our cricket again and there’s a team environment where we can go out and play. That’s the single biggest improvement from the winter.

Now it’s up to the senior players to perform to the levels that are expected of them. Matty, Cooky, Belly, myself and Jimmy have got to take a lot of responsibility. We can all up our game and if we do, we’ll be a force to be reckoned with.

Time to step up: The experience in the England side, Broad and James Anderson included, can up their game

Time to step up: The experience in the England side, Broad and James Anderson included, can up their game

Bowlers’ workload

Between Lord’s and Headingley I bowled 108 overs in a week. That’s much more than I’ve been used to in years gone by and I must admit I’ve never been as sore after a match as I was after Lord’s.

I do feel my knee but with patella tendonitis that’s always going to be the case until it burns itself out or it’s decided I need surgery.

Charging in: Broad says his heavy workload of 108 overs in the two Tests against Sri Lanka took it out of him

Charging in: Broad says his heavy workload of 108 overs in the two Tests against Sri Lanka took it out of him

With Swanny gone it’s a workload we’ll have to get to used to, although I think as Mo Ali plays more he’ll get more confidence and bowl more overs.

He gets great revs on the ball. With five Tests coming up against India in rapid succession it’s almost certain there will need to be some rotation of our quick bowlers.

Good revs: England's Moeen Ali will hopefully bowl more in future Tests to ease the burden of the pacemen

Good revs: England’s Moeen Ali will hopefully bowl more in future Tests to ease the burden of the pacemen

My form

Although I was proud to become the first Englishman to take two Test hat-tricks I can’t escape the fact I didn’t bowl well at Headingley. I really struggled with the Headingley hill and it affected the lengths I bowled.

Running up that hill feels like a mountain and it made me feel stretched in my strides and that makes my front arm fall away.

Milestone: Cook belatedly congratulates Broad once everyone realised he became the first Englishman to take two Test hat-tricks at Headingley

Milestone: Cook belatedly congratulates Broad once everyone realised he became the first Englishman to take two Test hat-tricks at Headingley

It’s easier bowling down the hill but Jimmy prefers that end.

We knew we had to bowl fuller but by not being able to get any rhythm it affected the lengths I bowled. That frustrated the hell out of me.

Unhelpful tracks

Neither Lord’s or Headingley favoured England’s seamers and I’m sure the Sri Lankan players would have been on their flight home laughing at the wickets they were presented with. I can’t imagine us turning up in Colombo and finding a green seamer. The wickets were very dry.

Go Mo Ali!

It was such a shame we couldn’t quite get across the line at Headingley because Mo played one of the great England knocks there and deserved more for it.

The way he left the ball outside off stump was phenomenal and when he gets going he’s a lovely batsman to watch.

Deserved more: Moeen Ali's century for a losing side at Headingley was among the great England knocks

Deserved more: Moeen Ali’s century for a losing side at Headingley was among the great England knocks


Cricket | Mail Online

England gagged over Shane Warne row after critcisim of captain Alastair Cook

When he made a tactless but essentially harmless jibe against Nick Knight in early 2012, Pietersen wasn’t given a warning — he was fined and publicly humiliated right away, the beginning of Andy Flower’s sustained campaign against England’s best batsman. When Cook said “something should be done” about Warne, nothing happened. Clearly, there is nothing the ECB will not do to protect our worst-ever captain, however the England team suffers.

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Cricket | Mail Online

Jonathan Trott set to make new comeback for Warwickshire at Edgbaston on Sunday

  • Former England No 3 Trott will line up against Nottinghamshire
  • He hasn’t played first class cricket for 10 weeks
  • Trott informed the ECB of his intention to return this week
  • Although appearing in Twenty20 Blast matches, he didn’t play on Friday

By Richard Gibson

Jonathan Trott makes his comeback to first-class cricket on Sunday as he plays for Warwickshire in the County Championship against Nottinghamshire at Edgbaston.

Trott, 33, did not feature in Friday night’s Twenty20 defeat to Derbyshire to give himself a chance to prepare mentally for the switch back to four-day mode.

Trott has not played a first-class match for 10 weeks but advised the England and Wales Cricket Board and his county bosses that he was ready to resume his career during talks this week.

Back in action: Former England No 3 Jonathan Trott will play first class cricket for the first time in 10 weeks

Back in action: Former England No 3 Jonathan Trott will play first class cricket for the first time in 10 weeks

Rebuilding: Trott begins his hopeful comeback to the top level at Edgbaston against Nottinghamshire

Rebuilding: Trott begins his hopeful comeback to the top level at Edgbaston against Nottinghamshire

Trott has played a couple of NatWest Twenty20 Blast matches in the past fortnight. But featuring in only his second Championship match since quitting the Ashes tour last November one defeat into the 5-0 whitewash with stress-related symptoms is viewed as a significant step in his rehabilitation.

Trott began the season for Warwickshire but lasted only one Division One match — scoring 37 and 26 against Sussex — before suffering a recurrence of the problem.

The 49-cap England Test batsman spent a further six weeks away from the game before returning to second XI duty at the start of June. He has struck two hundreds since.

Warwickshire have not revealed a squad for Sunday in a bid to keep the return low key but Trott will slot in batting at No 3 with Warwickshire captain Jim Troughton unfit (back).

‘Having a world-class player coming back into the fold does nothing but help,’ said the club’s director of cricket Dougie Brown.

At his best: Trott celebrates a century for England against New Zealand in 2013

At his best: Trott celebrates a century for England against New Zealand in 2013

Finding his feet: Trott's been playing for Warwickshire's second XI and in Twenty20 Blast

Finding his feet: Trott’s been playing for Warwickshire’s second XI and in Twenty20 Blast


Cricket | Mail Online

Kevin Pietersen: There’s unhappiness in England dressing room after Sri Lanka loss

Kevin Pietersen believes there is an ‘underlying current of unhappiness’ within the England team following their first ever Test series defeat to Sri Lanka on home soil.

England suffered a 100-run defeat to Angelo Mathews’ side at Headingley on Tuesday to lose the two-Test Investec series after the tourists escaped with a draw in the opening match at Lord’s.

This latest setback prompted Pietersen, whose central contract was terminated by the England and Wales Cricket Board after the Ashes whitewash in Australia last winter, to suggest in his Daily Telegraph column that all was not well within the England camp.

Down: Sri Lanka beat England in all three forms of the game, including the Test series, during their tour

Down: Sri Lanka beat England in all three forms of the game, including the Test series, during their tour

All not well: Kevin Pietersen thinks there is something wrong in the England dressing room

All not well: Kevin Pietersen thinks there is something wrong in the England dressing room

He wrote: ‘England were in winning positions in both matches but blew it, and I believe that is a symptom of the senior players being very unsettled. They are not turning up for the captain or coach.

‘(Stuart) Broad and (James) Anderson looked jaded at Headingley. Why? Why was Jimmy so emotional? We have lost a lot of matches in the past but he has never shown such emotion. He has been through tougher times and suffered lower moments but never been in tears before.

‘It says to me there is an underlying current of unhappiness. The Australia tour was hard. We were beaten up due to a lot of reasons I cannot go into right now, and some of the senior players are still suffering, with the result that they are struggling to offer leadership in the dressing room.’

Pressure: Alastair Cook remains England captain despite poor results and his worrying batting form

Pressure: Alastair Cook remains England captain despite poor results and his worrying batting form

Outspoken: Sky Sports pundit and former Australia spinner Shane Warne has been a fierce Cook critic

Outspoken: Sky Sports pundit and former Australia spinner Shane Warne has been a fierce Cook critic

Centurion: Moeen Ali scored a hundred in the second Test against Sri Lanka

Centurion: Moeen Ali scored a hundred in the second Test against Sri Lanka

Pietersen, who made an unbeaten 24 in Surrey’s eight-wicket NatWest T20 Blast victory over Hampshire on Friday, went on to praise the manner in which England’s younger players have acquitted themselves over the past fortnight or so.

He added: ‘It was absolutely fantastic to see Gary Ballance, Sam Robson, Joe Root and Moeen Ali scoring hundreds.

‘Add Ben Stokes and (Jos) Buttler to the mix and suddenly England will have a team mostly made up of young cricketers without any baggage, taking to Test cricket quickly and being successful.’


Cricket | Mail Online

Atif Sheikh injures Shikhar Dhawan and scares India as tourists pile on the runs

  • India reach 333-4 in tour match against lowly Leicestershire
  • Dhawa took a blow to the arm from Sheikh, retired hurt on 60
  • 50s for Ghambhir and Pujara against second-string attack

By Paul Newman

The somnolent start to India’s tour was rudely interrupted at Grace Road yesterday by an injury scare to one of their most important batsmen.

Shikhar Dhawan, the star of India’s Champions Trophy triumph last year, was struck a nasty blow on the arm by the most impressive member of Leicestershire’s second-string attack on an otherwise carefree day of batting.

Atif Sheikh, a left-arm seamer of some pace but only one first-class match, kept India’s formidable line-up on their toes and forced Dhawan to retire hurt in this warm-up game when he hit him on the elbow after he had reached 60.

Agression: Atif Sheikh, who has only ever played one first class match, was a thorn in the tourists' side

Agression: Atif Sheikh, who has only ever played one first class match, was a thorn in the tourists’ side

Worry: Shikhar Dhawan receives treatment after being hit on the arm by a Sheikh delivery

Worry: Shikhar Dhawan receives treatment after being hit on the arm by a Sheikh delivery

Retired hurt: Dhawan left the field after the incident but India insisted his retirement was not forced

Retired hurt: Dhawan left the field after the incident but India insisted his retirement was not forced

India later insisted that Dhawan was fine and was about to retire anyway, in keeping with a practice-game philosophy familiar to observers of India coach Duncan Fletcher’s dismissive approach to tour matches.

Yet it was still reminiscent of the incident this time last year when a rapid left-arm bowler in Tymal Mills struck England’s Graeme Swann a nasty blow in a warm-up match at Chelmsford and almost put him out of the Ashes.

Only this time it was an opposition player who was undone by friendly fire.

Certainly England will not want the flamboyant Dhawan, who smashed 187 off 174 balls on his Test debut against Australia, to arrive at Trent Bridge for the first Test on July 9 with too many runs and form under his belt.

To that end Sheikh, who gained considerable pace and movement with the new ball, will have pleased England no end by ruffling Dhawan’s feathers and generally keeping India’s batsmen honest on a day when they cruised to 333-4.

Runs: Virat Kohli looked good during his 49-ball stay at the crease, but was bowled for 29

Runs: Virat Kohli looked good during his 49-ball stay at the crease, but was bowled for 29

Solid: Cheteshwar Pujura was one of two players to retire out after making it to a half-century

Solid: Cheteshwar Pujura was one of two players to retire out after making it to a half-century

On the pull: Ajinkya Rahane finished the day 47 not out as Leicestershire caused the tourists few problems

On the pull: Ajinkya Rahane finished the day 47 not out as Leicestershire caused the tourists few problems

The Nottingham-born left-armer played a single first-class game for Derbyshire before running into disciplinary problems with England Under 19s and then embarking on a nomadic search for a new county that has ended with him trying to establish himself at Grace Road.

On this evidence Leicestershire, bottom of Division Two without a victory this season, should give him a go.

Other than Sheikh, 23, there was not a lot to trouble an India team who had rendered this opening match non-first-class by insisting on using all 18 members of their squad over the three days, starting with a team of batsmen yesterday.

In the circumstances Leicestershire did well to take the wickets they did, with Murali Vijay falling to a catch by Angus Robson, younger brother of Sam, and Virak Kohli being bowled by a beauty from Shiv Thakor.

Rare breakthrough: Kohli was bowled by Shiv Thakor playing a loose shot but India dominated

Rare breakthrough: Kohli was bowled by Shiv Thakor playing a loose shot but India dominated

Disappointment: Kohli missed the chance to get some early runs on a tour where India could trouble England

Disappointment: Kohli missed the chance to get some early runs on a tour where India could trouble England

Other than that it was a tale of retirements, with Gautam Gambhir and Cheteshwar Pujara both calling it a day soon after reaching 50 and Ajinkya Rahane and Rohit Sharma then helping themselves to some easy runs.

India made a bigger splash off the field yesterday when Narayanaswami Srinivasan was confirmed as the first chairman of the International Cricket Council despite being barred from his role as president of the Indian board by the Supreme Court of India.

Driving away: Guatam Ghambir plays a good shot as India piled on the runs against Leicestershire

Driving away: Guatam Ghambir plays a good shot as India piled on the runs against Leicestershire

Rising force: Dhawan, who averages almost 50 in his seven tests, looked in good form before getting hurt

Rising force: Dhawan, who averages almost 50 in his seven tests, looked in good form before getting hurt

The elevation of Srinivasan is part of the controversial ‘power grab’ of the world game by the boards of India, England and Australia and comes even though he has been forced out of power, for now at least, in his home country as part of an investigation into corruption in the Indian Premier League.

Moeen Ali, who struck a maiden Test century of high class in a losing cause at Headingley on Tuesday, is the only member of the England team beaten by Sri Lanka who will feature in county cricket ahead of the first Test against India.

The other players, including under pressure captain Alastair Cook, will prepare for Trent Bridge in a two-day training camp at Loughborough next Tuesday and Wednesday instead.


Cricket | Mail Online